How much does a Pomeranian cost? (price + care expenses)

Price of a Pomeranian

The average cost of a Pomeranian is about $900 but can be anywhere between $600 and can go upwards of $2500 depending on the breeder and pedigree. However, this only accounts for the initial price of acquiring a Pomeranian. 

There are other expenses and cost that a Pomeranian dog owner will incur to care for this dog’s health, feeding, grooming, training, and so on.

These are just some of the costs that we are going to look at in detail this breed price guide.

People also ask- What is a Teacup Pomeranian? Click to learn more.

So, why don’t we get right into it? 

Pomeranian cost breakdown

Pomeranian cost Estimate table
Breeder price $600 to $10,000
Adoption costs $100 to $300
Grooming costs Between $30 and $150 per grooming session
Vet Bills Between $30 and $80 per check-up
Feeding costs Between $30 and $100 per month
Doggie supplies Around $600 annually
Miscellaneous Upwards of $150 annually depending on needs

You should note that the table above is only an estimate of some of the costs and expenses that may come along in the process of owning a Pomeranian. 

Teacup-Pomeranian-Dog-900x500

What is the initial price of a Pomeranian puppy?

On average a breeder will charge you about $900 for a Pomeranian puppy. However, this price can vary between $600 and $2500 and can go as high as $10,000 for superior lines and pedigrees of Poms.

Pedigree is not the only thing that can affect tha price of this dog. There are other factors such as location, coat color, time of the year, age, gender, warranties, and so on.

Adoption is also a great option for acquiring a Pomeranian. It is also way cheaper as adoption fees can be $100 on average but can also go as high as $300.

Several perks come with adoption but as with anything good, there some disadvantages to it too.

Cons of Pomeranian adoption

  1. Free vaccination and health checks.
  2. You get an honest opinion about the dog’s personality traits.
  3. Most of them are trained or at least have some basic training.
  4. These dogs are calmer than puppies in most cases.

Pros of adopting a Pom

  1. The pooch can take time to get used to you and the new home.
  2. An adopted Pomeranian can suffer from anxiety if you are not there for him most of the time.
  3. Training an older Pomeranian is not as easy as a puppy.
  4. Some may have some unwanted traits that take time to correct.

You may also be interested in how much does a Great Dane cost.

Factors that affect the initial Pomeranian cost

Pedigree

A pedigree is a line of recorded and purebred Pomeranians.

Poms from a superior pedigree are going to be more expensive which is the same case with show line puppies.

Show line Pomeranian puppies can cost anywhere between $2500 and $10000 which is way more than the average price of $900. 

The quality of the puppy in terms of health, personality traits, and physical looks can also be a determining factor in the price of a Pomeranian puppy.

Location

The region where you live or get your puppy from will affect the price of the pup tremendously. This is because different regions will have different demands for each breed and different cost of living.

The regulation of that region has will also affect the final price of the Pomeranian.

Time of the year

There are periods where the demand of Pomeranian puppies fall and that is mostly in fall and winter excluding the Christmas period.

Breeders alter the prices of the puppies with demands and during the low demand periods, it may be your best time to get a Pom four-legged friend.

Breeder warranties and certification

The price a breeder offer you can include vaccination, spaying and neutering, registration, a health guarantee, and more.

These health guarantees or warranties can vary from one breeder to the other.

A breeder will also charge you for the certification papers if you want to get your Pomeranian registered as a show dog or anything else.

Most dog lovers get Poms as pets rather than show dogs and so, this may not matter much.

However, you should make sure that you get a puppy from a responsible and reputable breeder that offers his/her pups the proper care.

Remember to check out our guide in how to find a good reputable breeder by clicking on the link to learn more.

Coat color, age, and gender

There are several Pomeranian variations mostly based on coat color. Some Pom coat colors can cost more than others depending on the demand for how rare the colors are.

For example, a solid black Pomeranian may cost more than a multicolored one or an orange or red Pom which is more common.

Age is also a price factor. Ideally, the best time to take a puppy from a breeder to your home is when he is about 8 weeks old. This is the period when the puppy will cost the most. 

However, if the puppy were to stay with the breeder for longer, let’s say 6 months, the price will go down. But if the pup is a show dog, he will still cost quite a lot.

Finally gender. Female Pomeranians can cost more than their male counterparts and are less common in pet sales.

Black-Pomeranian-are more expensive

Health and vet expenses

Generally, Pomeranians are quite healthy dogs with lifespans of between 12 and 16 years. This is as long as you are providing them with the right diet and exercise.

However, they are susceptible to health conditions such as dental problems, obesity, patellar luxation, hypoglycemia, tracheal collapse, and severe hair loss syndrome.

Some of these conditions can be expensive to treat and manage.

Health expenses can be recurring costs that every potential Pomeranian owner should know about.

The best way to cut medical expenses is by catching the health issue early through regular medical checkups. A Pomeranian health check-up can cost between $30 and $80.  

You breeder should also carry the following tests on your puppy before you take him home;

  • A cardiac examination (OFA)
  • Patellar evaluation
  • Ophthalmologist Evaluation

These tests can also be carried out by a qualified vet in an approved lab even after you have taken your Pom home.

Interesting read- Proven dog weight management tips.

Treatment and vet bills

In case, after a check-up, your Pomeranian is found with a condition that can be treated or managed to reduce the effects, you will need to pay for the expenses.

Here is a breakdown of how much it can cost to treat some of these conditions.

Treatment Cost estimate
Antibiotics administration $10 to $200
Patellar luxation $1500 to $3000
Ductus arteriosus surgery $2500 to $5000
Entropion $300 to $1500
Cataract surgery removal $1500 to $5000 per eye
X-ray $50 to $200
Dental cleaning and teeth extraction $600 to $1200
Patent Ductus Arteriosus $2500 to $5000
Cryptorchidism $200 to $500
Legg-Perthes Disease $1000 to $3000
Vaccination about $200
Anti-rabies vaccine $10 to $50 per year

Pomeranian medical cost

Pomeranian neuter and spay services cost

Before the Pomeranian’s 6 month birthday, it is important to make sure that he has been neutered because this housetraining this dog can be difficult.

  • Neutering for this dog can you between $100 and $150.
  • A Pomeranian spay surgery will cost between $100 and $250.

You may also be interested in learning more about how to toilet train a puppy. 

Insurance cost

Having a health insurance cover is a great way to deal with any health emergency and even recurring medical expenses.

The average cost of a Pomeranian’s health insurance cover is between $35 and $75 per month. Depending on the deductible you choose and tha place you live, the insurance cost can vary. 

How much does it cost to feed a Pomeranian?

Pomeranians are small dogs that will not need a lot of food. Below is a feeding guideline for this dog;

  • 1 pound puppy- 0.5 cups.
  • 3-pound puppy- 1 cup of dry food.
  • 5-pound puppy- 2 cups.
  • 6-pound puppy- 1.5 cups.
  • Adult- about 0.5 cups of dry foods.

Basic dry foods cost around $250 per year for a Pom. One 30 pounds cost $60 on average and can last you for around 2 to 3 months. However, if you have a more expensive taste, holistic foods will coat around $500 per year.

Special foods, such as vet therapeutic foods or freshly-made/special-order food, may cost $100 plus per month.

Grooming cost

Pomeranians have adorable coats that need constant care through grooming.

Grooming this dog yourself is a great way to save money that you would have otherwise incurred if you visited a professional groomer.

However, you will still need to visit the groomer twice every year at least. One grooming session will cost you between $30 and $150. 

Pomeranian grooming cost

Training

Training your Pomeranian by yourself is best if you are comfortable doing it and if you have experience in basic training. However, this dog can be difficult to housetrain and you may need the help of a professional trainer.

The alternative is to take your dog for training classes and personal training lessons by professionals.

Puppy training classes can cost between $5 and $20 while individual training sessions will cost between $30 and $150.

Doggie supplies

Below is a breakdown of some of the supplies that you may need for your Pomeranian and their estimated prices.

Supplies Cost estimate
Crate $35 to $200, depending on the size of the crate.

Small hard crates start at about $25 while decorative crates will cost between $100 and $600

Harness and leash Between $10 and $100
Toys between $5 and $100 depending on the number and type of toy you are getting.
Doggie dish as low as $5 per piece
Doggie bed around $100 but some can go for as low as $30

Summary

Pomeranians are great dogs that are ideal for experienced dog owners mostly. They are energetic and lively making sure that you when they are around.

However, before deciding to get this dog as your next addition, you should first check out what it will entail to own and take care of one. This will include looking at what it might cost you annually.

You will, however, not get disappointed owning a Pomeranian.

Let us know what you think in the comment section below. 

There you go, WOOF!

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